By Denise Abel, Nancy’s Notions Guest Blogger

Take your Halloween projects up a notch by making them glow in the dark. Technology in crafting has come a long way, and there are a number of ways to use newly available products to add an extra element of fun to your “spook-tacular” Halloween sewing and crafting projects. Not only are they fun, but when you use them for kids’ projects, they can also provide you with some peace of mind that your little ones will be more visible when they’re out at night.






Did you know thread can glow in the dark? Nite Lite Extra Glow Thread comes in six colors and glows for up to six hours after being charged with light for only a few seconds. Use it for decorative stitching on costumes, clothes, or decorations. The thread looks slightly tinted, but when you turn out the lights, the colors bloom into deeper fluorescent shades.






If you’re an embroidery enthusiast, stitch up some cool designs using Glow in the Dark Embroidery Designs. This collection includes pumpkins, ghosts, skeletons, bugs, eyes, suns, moons, planets, stars, fairies, flowers, butterflies, geometric designs, and more. There are 55 designs in all, and you receive a free spool of Glow in the Dark Thread with your purchase. This thread glows a bright fluorescent green and is perfect for embroidering a spooky Halloween design on a Trick or Treat Bag for the kids to collect their goodies from the neighbors. Download free pattern instructions to make this easy project for your little trick-or-treaters. Their glow-in-the-dark bags will make them the envy of the neighborhood.






Create your own glow-in-the-dark appliqués to add to any project with Glow in the Dark Dimensional Fabric Paint. Simply choose your color—green, blue, natural, yellow, orange, or pink—and paint it onto a piece of fabric. Let it dry, then trace a shape onto the painted fabric and cut out. Stitch the appliqué shape onto costumes, clothes, or decorations for your home. Download the free pattern instructions to sew a cape for your favorite super hero or heroine.






Start with basic embroidery blanks and add Glow in the Dark Beads to dress up accessories and home décor. You can make a plain purchased table runner look festive by stringing the beads and attaching them to the ends. Drape this over your dinner table or a serving table at your Halloween party. Guests will rave when it gets dark.






You can serve your guests in style with an apron adorned with Glow in the Dark Beads. We stitched alternating bead colors and styles along the top and side seams of an apron for a festive look, but you could use this same technique on any project.






Buttons are a simple addition to embellish projects, but Glow in the Dark Buttons really add punch when the lights go out. Sew them on kids’ costumes, tote bags, and more. Use them to make jewelry and accessories kids will love to wear out at night, including bracelets, necklaces, and even belts. And they couldn’t be easier to make. Just string Elastic Thread in and out through the buttonholes until you reach the desired length, then just tie the ends into a knot.






Think outside the box when working with glow-in-the-dark supplies. Use your creativity and combine different products to make fun and easy projects that demonstrate your holiday style. We started with a premade towel and Jumbo Rick Rack for this simple project. We cut the rick rack the width of the towel, plus 4″ to wrap around to the back, then we painted the rick rack with Glow in the Dark Paint (using the natural color), and let it dry. Using clear Fabric Glue, we glued the rick rack evenly near the bottom edge of the towel, then glued Glow in the Dark Buttons in the curves of the rick rack. It was easy, and (other than time for the paint to dry), it took about 60 minutes.






Put your creativity to work and start your glow-in-the-dark project today. What have you been inspired to make using these new products?

Thank you to today’s guest blogger Denise Abel at Nancy’s Notions!

Bye for now,

Nancy Zieman The Blog

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