Serge a scarf in 30 minutes Nancy Zieman Baby Lock's National Serger Month







If you’re only using your serger for finishing fabric edges, you’re missing out on a lot of serging fun and creativity! I’d like to show you how the standard overlock stitch you’ve used for clean finishing raw edges, can also be featured as an outer edge finish. Give it a try with my 30-Minute Scarf!

How to serge a 30-minute scarf

Recently, I produced a 3-part Sewing With Nancy TV series, Sew Amazing Scarves. The Loop and Tuck Scarf was one of my favorite designs. (You can watch the TV series online by clicking here.) The original scarf was sewn with conventional seams, but you can easily serge the edges with just a few modifications. In the book, Sew Amazing Scarves, you’ll find the pattern.

  • The original pattern started with a 13″ x 19″ rectangle with a 2-1/2″ x 20″ extension added along one short end. For this variation, round the three corners by tracing along a saucer. It is easier to serge around a soft corner instead of turning corners or serging off at the corners.

Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf

  • Fold one yard of fabric wrong sides together and cut out two layers. I used vintage pattern weights that I’ve been using for years and a rotary cutter for a speedy cutting process.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Pin the layers wrong sides together. Place pins parallel to cut edges, when serging.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Set the serger for a narrow 3-thread overlock stitch. Test various stitch lengths on fabric scraps. A 2.0 mm length was the winner.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf




Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Begin serging at the narrow edge of the scarf extension. Serge, trimming off an 1/8″ to 1/4″ of fabric. Serge from scarf end to scarf end.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Serge the short end. You might need an anchor cloth, a folded scarp of fabric, which allows you to serge smoothly from the anchor to the narrow end.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Dab the ends of the thread tails with a seam sealant such as Fray BlockWork on a paper towel, which will absorb all the excess liquid.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Fold back 2-1/2″ at narrow end and topstitch to the scarf at your sewing machine. I love my 5-in-1 Sliding Gauge for quick measuring. 


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf




Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Ta-dah! The 30-minutes serger scarf is complete.


Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



  • Tie the scarf by slipping the main body of the scarf through the loop. Loop all or part of the scarf through the opening. This scarf stays in place and is extremely comfy to wear.



Serge a scarf in 30 minutes Nancy Zieman Baby Lock's National Serger Month









Baby Lock National Serger Month Nancy Zieman How to serge a 30-minute scarf



Sew Amazing Scarves—a total of 20 easy-sew options

Check out the book with patterns, Sew Amazing Scarves for other quick, trendy, and stylish scarves.


Sew Amazing Scarves Sewing With Nancy Zieman



 I hope you enjoy this serging scarves tutorial!


Nancy Zieman Sewing With Nancy, Sew Amazing Scarves TV series



 

Bye for now,

Nancy Zieman The Blog

Nancy Zieman—author, pattern designer, businesswoman, producer, and national sewing authority—is the host of the popular show Sewing With Nancy, which appears exclusively on public television stations across the United States and Canada. Follow Nancy’s blog at NancyZieman.com/blog and sign up to receive Nancy’s E-News for the latest news in sewing, quilting, & creating.
Content in this feed is © copyright 2015 by Nancy Zieman and may not be republished without written permission. You’re welcome to forward the email to a friend or colleague but it’s not okay to add the RSS feed automatically as content on a blog or other website.
image_pdf