The Princeton Public Library

Terry Kohl, Guest Blogger for Nancy Zieman

When I think of quilting I think of love. Those two words go together like hugging and kissing. So when I decided to spearhead a fundraising project that benefits a library and kids in crisis, guess who I thought of? Yup, quilters.

Partnering with Madison Area Chapter of Project Linus, the little public library in Princeton, WI, has launched a rather daunting global campaign called, The Quilt That Built a Library. Here’s the premise: The library needs a new building addition and Project Linus has an ongoing need for blankets. As Charles Schulz’s Linus character from the PEANUTS® comic strip was comforted by his blanket, Project Linus strives to do the same and more for children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need.

The Quilt That Built a Library project is targeted towards quilters who span not only continents but also cultures. As a blanket, a commemorative covering, and a work of art, the quilt is a nearly universal cultural artifact. It is being recognized as one of our most compelling symbols of cultural diversity and as a secondary story, one that tells the power of women. It is this power we are tapping into.

We are asking quilters to sew and donate a child’s themed block, and along with sending in that block we ask for a $5 donation. The blocks will be made into quilts by the Madison, WI Project Linus Chapter and the tax exempt monetary donations will go to the Princeton Public Library building fund. Seems like a win-win to me.

The project goes through March of 2013. Once all the blocks are in, a team of judges, including Nancy Zieman, will choose 30 blocks from all the entries. These distinguished blocks will be made into a full-sized quilt. Everyone who sews a block and donates $5.00 will be eligible to win this quilt in a raffle to take place before Mother’s Day 2013.

We also have a challenge for you in the form of a 9-piece star pattern. Choose your fabric and someday, somewhere, a child will be wishing upon your star.

For more information, including dimensions and address to send your block and donation to, visit the website of Princeton Public Library.

 

Donated quilt blocks

This 9-piece star was designed by Julie Buchholtz to be the signature block pattern for the Quilt That Built a Library.  You’re invited to download, use, and share freely. Pattern & directions.

 

 Or, you can donate a design and stitch a block of your choice. Perhaps you have a 12″ orphan block that would make an ideal donation!

The Quilt that Built a Library

Back to Nancy!

Thanks to Terry Kohl for giving us the update on this clever fund-raiser. I grew up with a small-town library near (it really was a book mobile) so this fund-raising campaign brings a smile to my face.

The criteria for the quilt block was to create a block with a children’s book theme. I chose L is for Lone Star by Carol Crane and illustrated by Alan Stacy.

The block was made with the Trace ’n Create Quilt Template—Lone Star Collection. Like a children’s book, the block is easy to sew–made without the traditional and trying Y-seams! Here’s how!

Lone Star Trace 'n Create Quilt Template

  • Gather a few fabrics. Scraps are welcome!


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Trace in the die-cut areas as indicated on the template for each of the three templates: A—B—C. There are two right-triangles (Templates A & C) and one diamond shape (Template B).


The Quilt that Built a Library




The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  See, scraps work well!


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Cut out along the traced lines. Be sure to use a rotary cutting mat!

The Quilt that Built a Library

  • Lay out the cut pieces, according to the template instructions. 


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  You’ll lay out half of the shapes as mirror-images.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Piece together fabrics from sections A to B.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Save time and chain piece the fabrics together.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Clip between the chain stitches.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Press the seam toward the diamond piece.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Add the fabric from Template C.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  After chain stitching, clip the threads again.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Create four units. Then create another four that are mirror-imaged.


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Lay out the units as pictured. Look grandma, no Y-Seams! (Oh dear, I’m a grandma!)


The Quilt that Built a Library



  •  Straight stitch the units together. Now, that’s easy!


The Quilt that Built a Library




The Quilt that Built a Library



Always looking!

My staff and I are always on the look-out for groups or individuals who are helping others through the gifts of sewing, quilting, and embroidering. If you know of a group who is “sew helpful,” let me know!

Bye for now,

Nancy Zieman The Blog

Content in this feed is © copyright 2012 by Nancy Zieman and may not be republished without written permission. You’re welcome to forward the email to a friend or colleague but it’s not okay to add the RSS feed automatically as content on a blog or other website.
image_pdf