McCall's 5890 by Nancy Zieman



It’s time for me to think about my wardrobe for spring. Each spring I add three new jackets and tops to wear at my speaking engagements. Knits are easy to pack among my sewing and quilting samples, so I count on at least two knit combos for travel. Even if you don’t consider packing constraints when you plan your next sewing project, I know that you’ll enjoy sewing my speedy jacket pattern, McCall’s 5890.

Jacket Sewing Pointers

I realize that you can’t make this jacket without the pattern and the pattern guide sheet gives you all the details (I know because I wrote the guide sheet), yet I wanted you to see just how easy it is to assemble this single layer jacket. If you haven’t sewn on knits before, this is your time to start!

I used a rayon/spandex fabric. It comes in vibrant colors, plus black. For those of you attending one of my spring or summer events, I’ll be wearing the purple jacket/top combo.

  • The sewing is very streamlined with the details and styling happening at the center back.


McCalls 5890 by Nancy Zieman



  • The shawl collar is part of the front pattern. From the illustration you can see that the “wrong” side of the fabric folds to the front. Most knits look great on both the right side and “the other right side.”


McCalls 5890 by Nancy Zieman



  • The key sewing step is to staystitch the inner corner of the shawl collar and then clip to the staystitching. Of course, you would use matching thread. Here I’ve used contrasting thread so it would show up in the photo.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • The inner corner of the collar is met to the neck/shoulder corner of the back. By placing a simple dot at the seam line, everything will align. Marking—it’s SO important.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • The center back of the shawl collar is pleated—there are markings on the pattern piece so you know just how deep to make the pleats.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • Then, the center back seam is sewn wrong sides together. This breaking from tradition will allow the center seam allowances to be hidden at the center back. Seems strange, but it works.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • The neckline seams is sewn with wrong sides together, too. Not to worry, you’ll not see the seams when you’re wearing your jacket.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • The other tip I’d like to share is how to finish the outer edges. I like to stitch 1/4″ from the edges, fold along the stitching and then fold again.


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman




McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



Topstitching is next. It’s easy, with the exception at the lower edge of the hem. With six layers of fabric at one point, use an anchor cloth. Stitch on a scrap of fabric and then onto the garment. After sewing, clip off the anchor. You’ll love the results. (For more sewing tips like the Anchor Cloth technique, check out Sewing A to Z.)


McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman




McCall's 5890 by nancy zieman



  • So, that’s it. The two techniques that really make McCall’s 5890 speedy to sew!

Included in the pattern are several wardrobe coordinates. Enjoy!


McCall's 5890 by Nancy Zieman



Bye for now,

Nancy Zieman The Blog

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